October 2016

 

 

A Summer of Inspiration for The Aquarian Teacher Level Three

 

 

Yogi Bhajan

The summer of 2016 was an inspiring time as the Level Three program emerged from a vision held by many dedicated teachers into a manifested reality. The 2nd annual Aquarian Teacher Level Three Melas were held in Espanola, NM in June and at Chateau Anand, France in July.

“Mela” is a joyous word that means a gathering of spirit in celebration. These gatherings of yogis were truly something to celebrate! We had over 60 participants at each event. Some were starting on their second year and some were just beginning the 1000-day journey. The Melas were inclusive and rejuvenating, with old friends in reunion and new friends in bloom. As each participant immersed themselves in the teachings, inspiration flowed freely and deeper levels of experience were opened.

A Level Three teacher is a true teacher, one who continues to do the hard work of developing and expanding their spiritual capacity. It is with profound gratitude and delight that we acknowledge the 23 Level Three “graduates” from the initial test group comprised of Teacher Trainer Executive Council (TTEC) members. Well Done!

 

What is Level Three?

Yogi Bhajan
 

The Level Three Program is a personal and journey to Self-Realization. In it, we refine our authentic identity as a Teacher and deepen our unique relationship to the Sacred. It is a 1,000-day commitment to:
• Participating with your peers in dialogue sessions
• Diving deep into the meditative mind
• Cultivating spiritual maturity
• Developing an attitude of selfless service through seva
• Attending at least 3 Melas (Level Three gatherings)

If this sounds interesting to you and you are already Level Two certified. Then CLICK HERE to see the full list of prerequisites. You may qualify to participate in the Level Three Mela next year! If so, consider joining us next summer and experience for yourself the inspiration and encouragement that Level Three training can bring. More information on how to apply will be available soon.

If you have questions, please email Sat Shabad Kaur: Level3@kriteachings.org

Hold the dates if you want to Apply!


Dates and Locations of the 2017 Level Three Melas

Location Hacienda de Guru Ram Das, Espanola, NM, USA
June 11 (evening) Arrival, Registration & Dinner
June 12, 13 & 14 Mela Event
June 15 Farewell Breakfast (move on to Trainer Forum or Summer Solstice)
   
Location Château Anand, France
24 July Arrival, Registration & Dinner
25, 26, 27 July Mela Event
28 July Farewell Breakfast (pack up and move to Fondjouan for Yoga Festival)

Nirvair Singh Khalsa

The Aquarian Teacher, KRI Level Three Program
Level Three Mela
Hacienda de Guru Ram Das, Espanola, NM, USA
June 11-15, 2017
Chateau Anand, France
July 24-28, 2017

For more information: satshabad@kriteachings.org.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Note From Nirvair

 

Sat Nam. Greetings from New Mexico!

The month of October is a sweet month in Espanola. The busy activity of the summer is over, and the birthday of Guru Ram Das is celebrated with meditation and joy. On October 6, 2004 Yogi Bhajan left his earthly home in Espanola, and it is with a soft mixture of joy and sadness that we remember his life. Joy in that we are so lucky to practice the technology of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan® in this lifetime! And sad because we miss his physical presence among us. For me, what evaporates any sadness is exploring the Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® and experiencing again the master doing what he did best – teaching.

In Stockholm Sweden on 11/21/90 Yogi Bhajan talked about the secret to happiness - Develop your intuition. He said,


The science that develops the human mind and intuitive process of life and living is called Kundalini Yoga. Normally, it is said that it is a dangerous science. Yes, without teacher it is. Just as you can get into an accident if you drive a car without first learning. Kundalini Yoga means subjecting your ego to your own creative consciousness. In other words, evolving from a habitual animal to someone totally trained and sensitive. It means super sensitivity. Not within yourself but in relation to all the people you know and how you deal with and feel about them. Naturally, it is a very powerful way of living life.

My process to teach this is based on this subject - ‘Am I supposed to suffer?' Answer is, 'No.'

'What is the way? Can I protect myself?' The answer is, 'No.'

'But I want to protect myself; I want to have a relationship. Can I have a relationship?'

Answer is, 'No, but I want to have a relationship’.

So what should I do so that all that I want, I can have? Become intuitive! You must know. Become sensitively learned. My antenna must guide me and inform me what is going on.

Am I not tired of living a ridiculous dumb life? Being a pawn of circumstances, emotions, and feelings. Being intellectual and not being intelligent. Just being processed because the subjectivity of my mind goes on and on? Ultimately it takes over all of me, consumes me, and then finally there is nothing left of me. I live fifty, sixty, seventy years and then go empty. What did I achieve? A few sexual relationships, a few dialogues, a few friends, and a few enemies. Somewhere I won and somewhere I lost. Some money was put in the bank and some was paid in taxes. Some few kisses, some few slaps, some sweet loves, and some few reprimands.

Is that it? Is that all a life is? That is the question which was asked by the yogis, the sages, and the wise men; the men of great religions and the men of great experience. That was the question.

As human do we have right to live an absolutely happy life?

The answer is, ‘Yes.’

But how?

Answer is, ‘Develop your intuition!’


Yogi Bhajan
Painting of Guru Ram Das

We celebrate Guru Ram Das birthday this month. Guru Ram Das was a humble man and a great saint and healer. You can use your intuitive sensitivity and the vibration of Guru Ram Das for happiness and for service. As teachers, people will naturally be drawn to you for inspiration, healing, and help. On April 27, 1997 at a Masters Touch course for teachers, Yogi Bhajan said,
 

There is nothing but you, and there shall be nothing but you. Kundalini shall rise in you.


Experience will give you the power to share and you need the strength to care. Wherever you go—grow and glow. If you cannot sacrifice your personality, you cannot reach reality; because your personality becomes darkness and blackness for you and it will be your own block. Drop it! This is what we say and that is what He teaches. “Hail Guru Ram Das, and heal the world.” It is His problem to heal. Your problem is to insert Him into it. You have nothing to worry about. If He doesn’t heal, His Name will be spoiled—what’s it to you? Most of the time you do not know what to do, true?  There are so many times I don’t know what to do. That is when I insert Him into it.


Use this technology this month. Whenever, you do not know what to do….in any situation…call on Guru Ram Das from within.

 

All the best with many blessings,

Nirvair Singh Khalsa
Nirvair Singh
 



Nirvair Singh Khalsa

CEO KRI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kundalini Africa Rising! Making a Difference Where It Counts


When the South African Government of National Unity came into power in 1994, with Nelson Mandela as President, HIV/AIDS was made one of 22 lead projects in the Reconstruction and Development Program instituted by the new government. The years that followed saw many failures to sufficiently address the massive destruction that the disease had created within families and communities. By 2005 more than 5 million South Africans were infected, making South Africa the country with the highest HIV rates in the world. The government of Thabo Mbeki (President-elect after Nelson Mandela) did much damage to the fight against HIV/AIDS by claiming that HIV does not lead to the development of AIDS. Many activist organizations were created during the decade after 1998, to fight for the national provision of antiretroviral drugs to pregnant women and those who were HIV+. It was during this time, in 2006, that the eldest son of Nelson Mandela, 54-year-old Makgatho Mandela, died of AIDS. President Mandela, one of the first public figures to publicly state that his son died of AIDS, did much to dispel the painful stigma surrounding the disease. This stigma caused many unnecessary and premature deaths of people from AIDS because they would not agree to be tested, fearing rejection and sometimes violence from their communities if they were discovered to be HIV+.

In this climate, in 1996, I began teaching Kundalini Yoga as taught to Yogi Bhajan® to people infected and affected by HIV/AIDS in Cape Town and Johannesburg. The emotional atmosphere in the groups I encountered was fearful; every week someone died, and the people in the yoga community were frightened that it would be their turn next. Every weekend there were funerals. (In Africa, funerals are very sacred and important rituals, and they can last for an entire weekend.) The whole community attended the funerals of those who had died. Every week there were protest marches and rallies supporting the fight for the provision of free antiretrovirals in hospitals and clinics, and when we looked around us, again we saw the whole yoga community there. This electric energy, permeating through the classes that I taught, was amplified by the teachings of Yogi Bhajan and the Naad. People began to pick-up weight, skin lesions began to clear up, and stress-reactions started to reduce.

It was a time of fear and desperate hope and this led to an intense religious response within organizations devoted to the struggle against AIDS. It was this religious fervor that caused people to drop out of the Kundalini Yoga classes, for fear of negating their religious beliefs, and from 60-70 students in each class, the numbers dropped to 5 or 6 people attending.
 


Teaching to people with HIV/AIDS in Soweto in 1996

African Kundalini Yoga Teacher Training Foundation of Southern Africa

It was during the decade following 1996, while working with several NGOs dedicated to uplifting and improving the lives of disadvantaged communities, that I formed the idea of creating a Kundalini Yoga teacher training organization that would focus on dynamic and politicized black youth. I had participated in the youth-led activism in the struggle against apartheid (when I was a youth myself) and witnessed the youth-led struggle against HIV/AIDS. I believed that training the youth to become Kundalini Yoga teachers, in compliance with the guidelines of Yogi Bhajan, would address many issues simultaneously; health, wellbeing, spiritual tolerance, and inclusion on one hand and the problem of massive unemployment of youth on the other. Figures for unemployment are as high as 70% for ages between 15 and 34 years in Southern Africa, and these are also the ages most likely to contract HIV/AIDS and other ills connected to poverty and despair such as drug addiction and turning to sex-work to earn a living.

Hari Charn Kaur

AKYTTSA, African Kundalini Yoga Teacher Training Foundation of Southern Africa, was formed in 2015 with myself and five young South Africans who were the first generation of black Kundalini Yoga instructors sponsored by AKYTTSA. AKYTTSA is dedicated to spreading Yogi Bhajan’s teachings throughout marginalized communities in Southern Africa, through a movement called Kundalini Africa Rising. Kundalini Africa Rising has several initiatives, or incubator projects, that nurture young people interested in training as Kundalini Yoga instructors. One of these projects is called OKYC (Open Kundalini Yoga Classes), weekly classes managed and taught by the instructor-trainees of AKYTTSA. Since its inception AKYTTSA has sponsored 12 young black students in the study of Level One Teacher Training. These 12 students are engaged in running weekly classes in Alexandra (Yoga4 Alex), Soweto (Yoga4Soweto), and the inner city of Johannesburg, areas which are identified as being historically disadvantaged due to apartheid.

Hari Charn Kaur

It is my intention to train youth to the point where they, as lead trainers, can take over Teacher Training in Southern Africa. To date Kundalini Yoga in South Africa has been dominated by white teachers and black people are virtually non-existent in the white-taught and white-attended classes. This situation is being reversed in and around Johannesburg by the newly qualified and inspiring young teachers who are using social media to advertise and discuss Kundalini Yoga. They are attracting many new students who witness the change that Kundalini Yoga is making in the lives of their peers-as-instructors.

Another long-term goal of Kundalini Africa Rising is to purchase a building for an inner-city ashram as there is no accessible Kundalini Yoga ashram as yet in Southern Africa. In order to further our goals of spreading Kundalini Yoga into marginalized communities in Southern Africa, we need an ashram situated in the heart of the city which is easily accessed by those who do not have the means to travel. To reach the goals of Kundalini Africa Rising, we need funding, and so we are appealing to our worldwide community to assist us in realizing our dreams. To assist in making this goal a reality, please contact me at ravi.birthspirit@gmail.com or donate directly at CrowdRise. From Southern Africa to all the people of the world, Sat Nam.

 


OKYC in inner city Johannesburg - weekly classes

 

 


Mandela Day In Alexandra, 67 minutes of yoga taught by AKYTTSA trained teachers Bongi, Fhulufelo, and Emmah.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some of the current AKYTTSA-sponsored teacher trainees:

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hari Charn Kaur
Ravi Kaur is a Kundalini Yoga Therapist and healer in South. She is a family constellations facilitator and uses this method to reveal states of illness in the individual and family lineage. She works in rehabilitation centers for recovery from substance abuse as a counselor, and in counseling centers that address violence towards women and HIV/AIDS. Ravi is an internationally certified systems coach and works with couples and families. As a doula, she accompanies women from conception to weaning in their journey of motherhood. Ravi is currently writing a dissertation on the experiences of pregnant women with PTSD who do yoga therapy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yoga Research

An Attention/Meditation Based Intervention for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

By Nikhil Ramburn and Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D.

ADHD

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), as outlined in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR), is a relatively newly defined mental health condition that has achieved wide notoriety in modern society. However, excessive hyperactive, inattentive and impulsive children have been described in the medical literature for the last 200 years. While the clinical nomenclature has changed over time, many of the historical descriptions are consistent with the modern diagnostic criteria for ADHD. The three clusters of ADHD symptoms are inattention (easily distracted, wandering off task, difficulty sustaining focus, disorganized), hyperactivity (restlessness, moving constantly when it is not appropriate, excessive fidgeting, tapping or talking), and impulsivity (hasty actions without forethought that may have high potential for harm or negative consequences, desire for immediate rewards or gratification, socially intrusive behavior). Given the similarity between these symptoms, and those resulting from the chronic sleep deprivation that is universally common in children, adolescents, and adults, it is important that a careful diagnosis be made by qualified clinicians. ADHD affects children and teens and can continue into adulthood. In fact, ADHD is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders of childhood with an estimated prevalence of 5%.

This condition may have a negative impact on a child’s lifestyle by negatively affecting academic achievement, social relationships, and quality of life. Other common associated clinical features include disturbed sleep, which may impact cognitive functioning, and obesity, which seems especially prevalent in children with ADHD. In addition, individuals are at a high risk for comorbid disorders from the presence of depression in approximately 30% of patients and anxiety in more than 25% of patients. The presence of these exacerbating and comorbid risk factors warrants special treatment considerations. While conventional psychotherapy may address the comorbid risk factors, it usually does not provide training in self-regulation which may help children with ADHD to choose and adopt socially appropriate behaviors. In addition, current pharmacotherapy treatments including stimulants, while relatively effective in the short term, may carry serious side effects such as low appetite, cardiovascular irregularities, suicidal thoughts, and sleep disturbance. For these reasons, the safety and effectiveness of behavioral, complementary, and integrative therapies need to be further evaluated.

Yoga may prove to be one of those therapeutic approaches since the ability to calm the incessant fluctuations of the mind is a fundamental component of yogic philosophy and practice. In fact, advanced practitioners report less mind wandering and distractibility. This suggests that more traditional forms of yoga, which include meditation, could be useful to promote the control of attention. Indeed, mindfulness meditation can improve neuropsychological deficits present in ADHD patients such as attention control, emotion regulation, and executive functioning by strengthening the brain regions believed relevant to these deficits. A further benefit of mindfulness meditation in ADHD is that patients learn to observe and become aware of emotional states as temporary passing events, thereby enhancing emotional regulation, which helps to prevent impulsive reactions to emotions. Recent studies indicate that mindfulness meditation training has ameliorating effects on ADHD symptoms, which makes traditional forms of yoga, which include meditation, a viable alternative to conventional psychopharmacological treatments. In addition, yoga incorporates the benefits of physical exercise, which has shown moderate to large positive effects on inattention, hyperactivity, impulsivity, anxiety, executive function, and social disorders in children with ADHD.

There are fewer than a dozen research studies of yoga on ADHD patients, although this number is likely to increase with the growing prevalence of yoga and meditation in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. Most of the studies do not have a control group and contain a high risk of bias due to design limitations. The general findings, without being conclusive, do suggest that yoga could improve several of the risk factors associated with ADHD. For example, a 2004 randomized controlled trial (RCT) assessed 19 boys who were stabilized on medication and then randomly assigned to a yoga or a control group where they carried out cooperative activities. The yoga group received postural training which included stretching and load bearing in combination with rhythmical respiratory exercises. The yoga group also received relaxation training where participants progressively relaxed different body parts. Finally, a concentration technique called Trataka was imparted where participants focused on a word or shape followed by seeing the image with eyes closed while staying concentrated. The results showed several significant improvements in the yoga group but not in the control group on five subscales of the Conners’ Parents Rating Scales (CPRS), a standardized ADHD questionnaire, which measures opposition, emotional liability, restlessness, and the ADHD index. Although the small sample size and limited data set did not provide strong support for the use of yoga for ADHD, the findings did suggest that yoga may have merit as a complementary treatment for boys already stabilized on medication.

Another much more recent study was conducted by the prestigious National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences in Bengaluru, India in 2013 and evaluated 9 children diagnosed with ADHD. After 8 yoga sessions, researchers noted a significant improvement in the ADHD symptoms as assessed via several tools including the ADHD rating scale and disease severity. However, non-adherence among children to the yoga practice post-discharge from the child psychiatry unit in this study highlights one of the limitations of long-term yoga therapy for children. Despite the small sample size and lack of a control group, this study showed that children can learn yoga and that in-patients with ADHD do receive benefits from a yoga practice. A separate Indian study of a peer-mediated multimodal behavioral program, conducted in a poor urban setting in India showed similar improvements in students with ADHD. Local high school student volunteers facilitated the implementation of the Climb-Up program consisting of yoga, meditation and play therapy for 69 younger students aged 6 to 11, which resulted in remarkable improvements in the students’ school performances that were sustained throughout the year. By using local volunteers who also acted as mentors for the younger children, the study demonstrated that yoga could be a cost-effective solution that can be easily implemented in schools.

In summary, the published single-arm studies and pilot RCTs are statistically underpowered but provide preliminary support for the use of yoga with meditation in the treatment of individuals with ADHD. However, given the fact that this is a new field of clinical investigation, findings need to be replicated on larger groups and contain follow-up data to evaluate the long-term outcomes of yoga for ADHD. Ongoing research at the University of California, Davis is in fact using a RCT design for a 6-week yoga intervention in pre-school age children with, or ‘at risk’ for, ADHD. Investigators will examine behavioral symptoms, attention control and heart rate variability (HRV), which is an indicator of self-regulatory capacity. Another new study, at New York University, is focusing on children with increased levels of emotion dysregulation and inattention at the Girls Preparatory Charter School of the Bronx. Researchers are looking at the capacity of Little Flower Yoga for Kids, a yoga and mindfulness program for children to improve a child’s ability to sustain attention and regulate emotion. It is likely that new publications will appear regularly from recently completed clinical trials in this growing field of research.
 

yoga
Nikhil Rayburn grew up practicing yoga under mango trees in the tropics. He is a certified Kundalini Yoga teacher and has taught yoga to children and adults in Vermont, New Mexico, Connecticut, India, France, and Mauritius. He is a regular contributor to the Kundalini Research Institute newsletter and explores current yoga research.
yoga
Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. is the KRI Director of Research, Research Director for the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He has practiced a Kundalini Yoga lifestyle since 1973 and is a KRI certified Kundalini Yoga instructor. He has conducted research on yoga for insomnia, stress, anxiety disorders, and yoga in public schools, he is editor in chief of the International Journal of Yoga Therapy and The Principles and Practice of Yoga in Health Care and author of the Harvard Medical School ebook Your Brain on Yoga.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Important Yogic Research from KRI


KRI promotes scientific research related to yoga, providing support for Yoga Instructors bringing Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan® to health therapies and institutional settings. We invite you to explore our database of publications on our website:

Requests for re-publication and sharing this information are welcome and can be directed to Shanti@kriteachings.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sat Nam from The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings®

 
Gur RamDas

Wow! October already?! Time sure speeds up as the years move on. For those of us in the Northern Hemisphere, fall is upon us with golden leaves and chilly nights. For those of you in the Southern part of the world you are moving in to spring. Either way this shift in season allows for a shift in our pace, a time to change gears and follow the lead of the earth.

This month we celebrate the birthday of Guru Ram Das on October 9th, he was the 4th Guru of the Sikhs. Guru Ram Das Ji, known to many as the ‘Lord of Miracles’, held a special place in Yogi Bhajan’s heart and for many of us who follow this path. Yogi Bhajan taught us of Guru Ram Das Ji’s ability to manifest miracles. He spoke about his to capacity to protect, heal, guide, and rescue us from any situation. In this lecture in October of 1988 he asks us, in the spirit of Guru Ram Das, to elevate others and to pray to him whenever anyone needs help:

“If today, on the birthday of Guru Ram Das, you promise you will touch the heart of one person a day to elevate that person don't teach him religion, don't proselytize, don't say a thing. If a person calls you and says, “I am miserable; I am horrible; I am a terrible; this is hopelesss.” What should I say? Tell him to inhale and say “Wah,” exhale and say “Guru” and meanwhile in your heart say, “Guru Ram Das, please help this person.” It is easy to say, the shortest prayer, you don't have to repeat it. In the next minute it will be all done. That quick is this direct hotline. Quick.”
 

© The Teachings of Yogi Bhajan, October 26, 1988


Treat yourself and watch or read this entire lecture, he speaks not only about Guru Ram Das Ji but also about the many layers of religion, Sikhism, and integrity. It’s full of many inspiring gems! Guru Ram Das Ji’s Birthday is a powerful time to make your prayers. If you need a miracle in your life right now focus your prayer or mediation on the generous spirit of Guru Ram Das and tap in to the ‘direct hotline’

 

 

We cannot thank you, our beloved donors enough! Your steadfast generosity is so inspiring and is what keeps this free online resource evolving, expanding and becoming a complete resource of Yogi Bhajan’s precious teachings. Thank you for all that you do!

 

SSK
Shabd Simran Kaur Adeniji was blessed to be raised in the 3HO community. Originally from Oregon, she attended school in India from the age of 6 years old. Her professional background lies in woman's health and community building, spending many years abroad as a midwife. She is a Conscious Pregnancy Instructor and has a deep love for Yogi Bhajan's teachings. She integrates these precious teachings in her work as a midwife and educator. Today Shabd Simran serves the Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® and is a tireless advocate for the Endowment Fund.

 

In Gratitude,

Shabd Simran Kaur Adeniji, Fundraising Coordina
The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings®
Kundalini Research Institute
Email: donations@kriteachings.org
Find us on Facebook “The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings
www.libraryofteachings.com

The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® is a non-profit organization and all donations are tax deductible under IRS code 501(c)(3).

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source Specials

 


I Am A Woman Reader/Book

 

I Am a Woman: Creative, Sacred & Invincible
Selected Lectures from the Women's Teachings
Yogi Bhajan, PhD, Master of Kundalini Yoga

Retail: $39.95
Promo: $33.96

 

 

  I Am A Woman Yoga Manual

 

 

I Am a Woman: Creative, Sacred & Invincible
Essential Kriyas for Women in the Aquarian Age
Yogi Bhajan, PhD, Master of Kundalini Yoga

Retail: $29.95
Promo: $25.46

 

 

I Am A WomanI Am a Woman DVD Series
3 Sets of Lectures from the Women's Teachings of
Yogi Bhajan, PhD, Master of Kundalini Yoga

I Am a Woman: Practicing Kindness, (Volumes 1-5)

1. Create Your Reality
2. Spiritual Acceleration
3. Act Great and Never Be Turned by Fate
4. Know Yourself
5. The Art of Appreciation

I Am a Woman: Conscious Compassion, (Volumes 6-10)

6. The Known and Unknown
7. The Primal Force of Life
8. Communicating With Compassion
9. The Law of Life
10. Being Me: My Actions Define my Reality

I Am A Woman: The Creativity of the Creator, Volumes (11-15)
I Am A Woman
11. Creativity through Communication
12. A Woman's Impact
13. Resolve Your Inner Conflicts
14. The Art of Being a Woman
15. Intuitive Applied Knowledge

Retail: $19.95 per DVD
Promo: $16.96 per DVD

Check Online for even deeper discounts on any of the 3 sets of DVDs

 

 

 

And introducing a beautiful music CD from Sat Purkh Kaur Khalsa,
honoring the feminine:

The Pearl: Maiden, Mother, Crone

The PearlSongs:

1. Durga Mantra
2. Gaia Shabad
3. Shakti Mantra: Ek Ong Kaar Sat Naam Siree Wahe Guroo
4. Down On Me/I-Aanrjee-Ai Shabad Recitation
5. Jammee-Aa Poot Bhagat Govind Kaa
6. Poota Maata Kee Aasees
7. Guru Gayatri Mantra
8. Sopurkh Mantra
9. Bhand Jammee-Ai
10. 30th Pauree: Ekaa Maa-Ee Jugat Viaa-Ee
 

 


Retail: $17.99
Promo: $15.29

 

 

Thank You!

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

KRI Recipe of the Month for October 2016

 

 

Soup of Life—Hearty Vegetable & Herb Soup

 

Excerpt from:

From Vegetables, With Love: Recipes and Tales from a Yogi’s Kitchen (Revised and Expanded New Edition).
Siri-Ved Kaur Khalsa

Yield: 10 servings

I created this soup while I was Yogi Bhajan’s personal cook in the early 1970s and it became one of his favorites. The trinity roots—garlic, onions and ginger—add to the invigorating broth for a nourishing, light meal.


½ cup sesame oil
2 onions, thinly sliced
¼ cup minced fresh ginger
2 teaspoons turmeric
1 teaspoon black pepper
1 tablespoon caraway seeds
½ teaspoon ajwain
1 tablespoon poppy seeds
1 teaspoon celery seeds
1 tablespoon garam masala
2–3 ripe tomatoes
3 tablespoons basil
1 tablespoon dill weed
1 tablespoon oregano
1 tablespoon tarragon
2 quarts water
2 russet potatoes, diced
3 carrots, chopped
4 cups chopped green vegetables (any combination broccoli, kale, green beans, and so on)
Tamari soy sauce or salt
10 cloves garlic, minced

Heat sesame oil in a large soup pot. Add onions and ginger and sauté over a medium-high flame until tender. Make a pool of oil in the center of this mixture and add turmeric, pepper, caraway, ajwain, poppy seeds, celery seeds, and garam masala. Fry for 2 minutes. Stir and add tomatoes. When very well cooked, add herbs. Simmer for 3-4 minutes and add water. Bring to a boil and add chopped vegetables. Simmer over a medium-low flame for about 1 hour. Add more water if a lighter consistency is desired. Then add tamari (to taste) and garlic and simmer for 5 more minutes.

Excerpt From: Khalsa, Siri-Ved Kaur. “From Vegetables, With Love: Recipes and Tales from a Yogi’s Kitchen (Revised and Expanded New Edition).”


 

 


 

 

 

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