hyg     
 

August 2016

 

 

A Note From Nirvair

 

Sat Nam,

 

Greetings from New Mexico!

Yogi Bhajan

August is a special time for KRI. On August 26, 1929 in the village of Gujaranwala, a part of the Punjab that is now in Pakistan, Harbhajan Singh was born to Mata Harkrishan Kaur and Dr. Kartar Singh Puri. He went on to lead a remarkable life, bringing Kundalini Yoga to the west and creating a spiritual nation without borders.

For our sadhana on August 26th we will be chanting two and a half hours of the Adi Shakti Mantra - Ek Ong Kar Sat Nam Siri Wahe Guru and the mantra of Guru Ram Das - Guru Guru Wahe Guru Guru Ram Das Guru. These two mantras are chanted all over the world on Yogi Bhajan’s birthday. If you have not done it before, I highly recommend it. Check with your local Teacher about the time and place that it will be chanted in your locale.

Yogi Bhajan
On August 25, 1978, Yogi Bhajan talked about what he does on this birthday. I think it is a worthwhile practice for anyone!

“Normally when my birthday comes I ponder over one idea, “Why I was born?” I have been doing this exercise for the last forty-eight, forty-nine years. It's a very funny situation with me; for some people their birthday is a great day or small day. Not for me.  It is the greatest of great joy. That joy is because the highest honor was given to me; that I was born on that day and I could experience the breath and wonder of life. I always take a couple of hours to sit down and review the whole year to make an account: How many nuisances I have done, how much sense I have made, how many time I have cheated myself, and how conscious I was. How, how was my year? I confront myself. That's what I always do.”

Visit The Source, KRI’s on-line store, for digital downloads of your favorite Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan ® books and manuals. Now you can have all your teaching materials, including our new Summer Solstice offerings, on your Kindle, iPad or Computer in The Aquarian Collection! We have a special price on all 36 KRI books and manuals, which includes the new “Merging with the Infinite”, “Enlightened Bodies,” and “From Vegetables with Love.”

The Aquarian Collection

For those of you that already own many of our titles, check out our Manual and Publication Updates pages for correction and revisions.

Click Here for Manual Updates
Click Here for Publication corrections

The Yogi Bhajan Photo Archive is coming soon! Later this month we will launch a new database collection of photos of Yogi Bhajan and the people he touched, the events he attended, and the places visited. There are over 40,000 photos in the collection. It is a fascinating exposition of the amazing life of our great teacher.

Nirvair Singh Khalsa
Nirvair Singh and Nirvair Kaur on their wedding day with Yogi Bhajan, circa 1972
 

In gratitude and sending you many blessings,

Nirvair Singh Khalsa

CEO KRI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conscious Communication in Española


Summer Events

June 26 brought nearly 40 Kundalini Yoga instructors to Espanola to work together in Level Two Conscious Communication. This training program is a precious opportunity for instructors to work on themselves, explore their own mind and tendencies, and develop integrity in speech and communication. A conscious person talks with dignity, authenticity, and faith, developing the capacity to touch the very depth of another person. This beautiful group did the hard work and achieved the results.

“The international community that gathered to learn Conscious Communication in New Mexico this summer gives me hope in this challenging world. Each day they showed me that if we work hard together, engage the teachings, and face our own blocks, we can be part of the solution. We can heal ourselves and offer our powerful technology to our communities and planet".
Hari Kirin Kaur Khalsa, Lead Trainer

Level Two training is open to all KRI Level One Certified Instructors. The 2-year certification program consists of five 62-hour modules and fulfills the Yoga Alliance 500-hour requirement. Graduates of Level Two earn the title of Certified Practitioner of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan®. The five modules are:

 

  • Conscious Communication – Uplift and penetrate through the power of the word.
  • Mind and Meditation – Conquer the mind and conquer the world.
  • Authentic Relationships – Unfold your true identity in the matrix of conscious relationship.
  • LifeCycles and LifeStyles – Discover mystery and mastery through every cycle of life.
  • Vitality and Stress – Cultivate the caliber to guide yourself and others through life’s challenges.
Hari Kirin Hari Kirin Kaur Khalsa is a lead trainer and the author of Art & Yoga: Kundalini Awakening in Everyday Life. She met her teacher Yogi Bhajan at Ladies camp in the late 70's and has been practicing yoga ever since. Hari Kirin holds an MA in Creative Arts Therapies and a MFA in Fine Art. She teaches anatomy, philosophy and humanology through creative arts.

 

Don’t miss Level Two training in Espanola next summer, right after Summer Solstice Sadhana, with Authentic Relationships. Plan now and make 2017 your summer in New Mexico.

Future Level Two Training in Espanola

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yoga Research

Yoga for COPD: The Science and Research Evidence

By Nikhil Ramburn and Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D.

COPD
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammatory lung disease characterized by obstruction of lung airflow. Emphysema and chronic bronchitis are the two most common conditions that contribute to COPD. COPD symptoms include difficulty breathing, cough, wheezing, and shortness of breath. Individuals suffering from COPD are at risk for more frequent respiratory infections, cardiovascular conditions, lung cancer, and pulmonary hypertension. An individual’s quality of life is likewise affected because of their inability to partake in daily activities due to difficulty breathing and this can lead to psychological distress and depression. A primary cause of COPD is long-term exposure to lung irritants that damage the lungs and the most common irritant is cigarette smoke. Other lifestyle risk factors include lack of physical activity, a shallow and rapid breathing pattern, and psychological stress. In fact, stress is a common cause of flare-ups in COPD patients since stress itself can cause shallowness of breath and faster breathing.

COPD is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. behind cancer and heart disease and more than 3 million Americans are diagnosed with the condition each year. Current estimates suggest that COPD costs the nation about $50 billion annually in direct and indirect healthcare expenditures. In addition to the large burden on the healthcare system, the economic costs of COPD are compounded by lost productivity to premature morbidity and mortality making this condition a major public health concern. Unfortunately, the conventional methods of treatments are only of limited efficacy for this condition since existing medications do not modify the long-term deterioration of lung function. The increasing prevalence of COPD requires that we develop effective behavioral interventions that go beyond symptomatic treatment and focus on rehabilitation. While aerobic exercise and strength training are moderately effective behavioral interventions, yoga and especially controlled yogic breathing (pranayama) have been shown to improve respiratory rate, oxygen levels in the blood, and overall quality of life in patients with COPD.

Several of the disease factors can be addressed by a therapeutic yoga intervention. Yoga may be a beneficial therapy for COPD because it involves physical activity along with breath regulation and has well documented stress-reduction benefits. Indeed, yoga training reduces respiratory rate and increases the strength of respiratory muscles. Slow, abdominal, yogic breathing is known to be more efficient in gas exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide through deeper opening and expansion of the lungs. In addition, yoga decreases autonomic arousal and heart rate while reducing depression, anxiety, and panic attacks. Yoga also promotes healthy behavior habits, which can contribute to reducing lifestyle risk factors such as smoking. Finally, yoga may help COPD patients gain confidence that they can control their breathing, which along with the increase in physical performance could significantly improve their quality of life.

yoga
It is therefore not surprising that pranayama techniques have been shown to have therapeutic potential in treating COPD. In a case control study, conducted at a tertiary care institution in India, 50 individuals with moderate to severe COPD were divided into an intervention arm and control group. Half the individuals were trained in pranayama for 30 minutes twice a day while receiving their usual medication while the control group only received their usual medical treatment. Outcomes were assessed after 3 months and the intervention arm revealed significant improvement in the COPD assessment test and a 6-minute walk test, whereas the control group showed no such improvement. Researchers have suggested that pranayama results in various mechanisms of lung efficiency such as the rehabilitation of nonfunctional or closed airways. In addition, since pranayama promotes abdominal respiration it relieves the breathing diaphragm, improves oxygenation, and increases overall circulation. Pranayama also clears the airways and improves ciliary action, which helps to combat mucous secretions. Consequently, systemic inflammation is reduced and so are its manifestations. Therefore, more traditional yoga styles/practices that include pranayama as a key component are likely to be a better treatment strategy than the use of physical yoga exercises alone.

In the first meta-analysis and review of research on the efficacy of yoga for COPD, Liu et al. looked at five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) from 1978 to 2012 which encompassed 233 participants. The sample size per RCT ranged from 30 to 100 subjects per study and the duration of studies ranged from 12 weeks to 9 months. The reviewed trials all included pranayama alone or with yoga postures and the results reveal improvements in a variety of measures demonstrating improved lung capacity, ventilation and breath holding capacity after short-term yoga practice. In addition, studies suggested that yoga training may improve exercise capacity, prevent lung function decline, improve quality of life, and reduce dyspnea (a feeling of insufficient breathing or air hunger) in patients with COPD. However, these studies have a number of research design limitations including the small sample size of some studies. Despite these limitations, these preliminary results are encouraging and indicate that yoga training may be effective in improving lung function and functional exercise capacity in COPD patients compared with conventional therapy.

The first study to specifically measure the effects of yoga breathing on respiratory pattern and oxygen saturation in patients with COPD was published in 2009. This pilot study was conducted in Nepal by the team of Italian yoga researcher Luciano Bernardi and involved 11 patients, aged 59 to 80 years, with moderate to very severe COPD. Three of the patients were smokers, 2 nonsmokers, and 6 were former smokers. The patients practiced a complete, deep, slow yogic breathing pattern where they were asked to mobilize in sequence the diaphragm, lower chest, and then the upper chest during both inspiration and expiration. The main finding is that participants showed significant improvement in oxygen saturation (blood levels). To its credit, the yogic technique was not difficult to achieve and maintain, requiring at most 12 minutes to learn and patients reported feeling comfortable during the session. Despite the small sample size and lack of randomization, this pilot study provides encouraging preliminary evidence and encourages more extensive randomized trials to assess the long-term effects of yoga training for patients with COPD.

A more recent study evaluating yoga for COPD was a RCT involving 60 patients from the Guru Teg Bahadur Hospital in New Delhi, India. The 30 subjects from the experimental group practiced yoga for 2 months for 45 minutes in the morning and were monitored weekly for compliance at the cardiopulmonary laboratory. The transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide (TLCO), a measure of the ability of gas to transfer from the alveoli to the red blood cells, was recorded in both the control and experimental groups at baseline and after 2 months. This is significant because diffusion capacity is impaired in chronic lung disease and this was the first time that the effect of yogic exercises on lung transfer factor was evaluated. The results showed a statistically significant improvement after two months of yoga training whereas the control group which underwent conventional drug treatment had no change in TLCO.

In summary, studies to date have demonstrated the short-term efficacy of yoga to improve lung function and functional exercise capacity in patients with COPD compared with conventional therapy. This suggests that yoga could be a useful an adjunct pulmonary rehabilitation program for COPD patients. This is a cost-effective, easy to learn solution that addresses the underlying causes of COPD rather than just the symptoms. In addition, yoga provides the benefits of alleviating anxiety, improving quality of life and preventing deterioration of the lungs and musculature due to inactivity. Future research should ideally address the previous limitations of small sample sizes, lack of longer-term studies and inadequate data reporting and also provide information on the underlying mechanisms of yoga in COPD treatment. Innovative solutions such as Tele-Yoga interventions where classes are delivered via multipoint videoconferencing promise to make yoga therapy even more accessible and affordable to patients with COPD.

 

yoga
Nikhil Rayburn grew up practicing yoga under mango trees in the tropics. He is a certified Kundalini Yoga teacher and has taught yoga to children and adults in Vermont, New Mexico, Connecticut, India, France, and Mauritius. He is a regular contributor to the Kundalini Research Institute newsletter and explores current yoga research.
yoga
Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. is the KRI Director of Research, Research Director for the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He has practiced a Kundalini Yoga lifestyle since 1973 and is a KRI certified Kundalini Yoga instructor. He has conducted research on yoga for insomnia, stress, anxiety disorders, and yoga in public schools, he is editor in chief of the International Journal of Yoga Therapy and The Principles and Practice of Yoga in Health Care and author of the Harvard Medical School ebook Your Brain on Yoga.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Important Yogic Research from KRI


KRI promotes scientific research related to yoga, providing support for Yoga Instructors bringing Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan® to health therapies and institutional settings. We invite you to explore our database of publications on our website:

Requests for re-publication and sharing this information are welcome and can be directed to Shanti@kriteachings.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Birthday from The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings®

 
Yogi Bhajan
The month of August is a time of celebration here at The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings®. Yogi Bhajan’s birthday on August 26th gives us a chance to remember our beloved teacher, the source of the incredible teachings we are preserving.

In honor of Yogi Bhajan’s Birthday, we are excited to announce the launch of our Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings Endowment Fund. As we plan for the future we must make sure that these teachings are available for our children’s children to experience and an endowment fund will assure that. This endowment fund will generating income for the Library of Teachings for many years to come through the investment of your endowment donations.


As we celebrate the life and legacy of Yogi Bhajan, consider of the infinite ways in which your life has been impacted by these priceless teachings - how they have profoundly changed the way you are. As you feel the depth of their impact you can see their presence in each day. Your gifts and support are what make the work of preserving these powerful teachings possible.

“We have never had anyone write a check to build a building here or to cover any giant endowment, everything has been built with the dollars, one by one, that we have contributed into our community growth fund every month and into our fund drives. With this we have built a lot. Those of us who have been here since the eighties can look back and see how much we have accomplished! If we just keep contributing little by little, finding that extra amount every month, we will keep going and build that physical legacy that we are leaving for the future” Yogi Bhajan October 4, 1998

Join us online for our Endowment Fund Campaign during the 11 days leading up to Yogi Bhajan’s birthday on August 26th. Your ongoing support is so important to the work being done to create a free online resource of Yogi Bhajan’s teachings, thank you for all that you do to keep this work growing.

 

SSK
Shabd Simran Kaur Adeniji was blessed to be raised in the 3HO community. Originally from Oregon, she attended school in India from the age of 6 years old. Her professional background lies in woman's health and community building, spending many years abroad as a midwife. She is a Conscious Pregnancy Instructor and has a deep love for Yogi Bhajan's teachings. She integrates these precious teachings in her work as a midwife and educator. Today Shabd Simran serves the Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® and is a tireless advocate for the Endowment Fund.

 

In Gratitude,

Shabd Simran Kaur Adeniji
The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings®
Kundalini Research Institute
Email: donations@kriteachings.org
Find us on Facebook “The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings
www.libraryofteachings.com

The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® is a non-profit organization and all donations are tax deductible under IRS code 501(c)(3).

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Yogi Bhajan

 

 

Yogi Bhajan’s birthday is in August and each year Hacienda de Guru Ram Das in Espanola hosts a party to celebrate the event. Join us Saturday, August 27th, for an evening of Kundalini Yoga, meditation, music, food, and friends. Together we rejoice in celebrating the life and legacy of this great man, Yogi Bhajan. For more information: http://www.lifeandlegacyofyogibhajan.org
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source Specials

 

 

New from KRI:

Merging with the infinite

Merging with the Infinite
Teachings of Death & Dying
Preparation, Process & Prayers
The Teachings of Yogi Bhajan
Edited by Hargopal Kaur Khalsa

Life poses many questions. Dying is one of them: What do we do at the moment of death? For the most part, we deny death. We never really look into the nature of death as a cycle of life. We never examine our reactions; therefore, we never give ourselves the chance to practice how to die; as Warrior Saints, gracefully and courageously.


Our denial produces either fantasy or fear in the subconscious, which blocks prosperity and creates dis-ease in our lives and our relationships. We must learn how to confront the moment of death and determine our Self within it so that we can ‘cross over’.

“If a person doesn’t know how to die and doesn’t know where the grace is or how to confront that last moment, what is the purpose of life?” - Yogi Bhajan
 


Retail: $19.95
PROMO: $16.96

 

 

 

Crossing The HourCrossing The Hour
2 DVD Set
VIDEO LECTURES AND KRIYAS ON DEATH & DYING BY THE MASTER OF KUNDALINI YOGA, YOGI BHAJAN
 

Two DVD Set includes:
Living Weightlessly and Breaking the Bonds of Earth

In this meditation Yogi Bhajan guides you toward living weightlessly, lightly. What are the thoughts that weigh us down, tie us to our karmas? How do we break through them at the moment of death? Practice now! Live Now! And die with face and grace

Crossing the Hour of Death
This beautiful meditation guides you through a conscious death, leading you through:
• The pranayama of dying,
• Journeying toward the light,
• Traversing the icy realms,
• Floating free of Earthly concerns, and
• Consciously releasing your Self to die into life. 

Retail: $24.95
PROMO: $21.21

Merging with the infinite

Or get the new Merging with the Infinite book and Crossing the Hour DVD Combo for an everyday low price of $35.95!
 

 

 

Enlightened Bodies Enlightened Bodies
Exploring Physical and Subtle Human Anatomy
Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan®
Nirmal Lumpkin, LMT and Japa Kaur Khalsa, DOM

Enlightened Bodies inspires and elevates the approach and study of the human body, interconnecting anatomy, physiology, and ancient yogic teachings. Enlightened Bodies presents the complexities of the body in a refreshing and approachable style, integrating multiple perspectives including:
•Human Anatomy
•Ayurveda
•Kundalini Yoga
•Traditional Chinese Medicine
•Self-Care
•Other lifestyle traditions

This is an essential book for yoga enthusiasts and healthcare practitioners who are looking for a deeper understanding of the human body and ways to incorporate complementary health practices in their treatment plan.

Regular Retail: $39.95
Promo: $33.96

 

 

Thank You!

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

KRI Recipe of the Month for August 2016

 

 

Excerpt from:

From Vegetables, With Love: Recipes and Tales from a Yogi’s Kitchen (Revised and Expanded New Edition).
Siri-Ved Kaur Khalsa

quinoa

Summer Quinoa & Veggie Salad

Yield: 4–6 servings

This healthy, Mediterranean-inspired salad is light but satisfying, and perfect for the warmer summer months. Serve as a small salad or enjoy alone as a meal. Keeps well in the fridge for a few days.

2–3 cups cooked quinoa

4 small Persian cucumbers or 1 large cucumber, chopped into small pieces
1 pint cherry or pear tomatoes cut into halves
1 bunch flat leaf parsley, finely chopped
¼ cup finely chopped fresh mint leaves
¼ cup finely chopped chives or scallions
½ cup feta cheese, crumbled (optional)

For the Dressing

Extra virgin olive oil Juice of ½ large lemon or full small lemon 2 cloves garlic, minced very fine Salt and pepper to taste

Put cooked and cooled quinoa in a large mixing bowl and combine the rest of the salad ingredients. In a separate bowl, mix together dressing ingredients and then pour over salad and toss well.

Serving Options: Garnish with chopped avocado, add hemp seeds or nuts of choice, and/or serve atop chopped arugula, raw kale, or mixed lettuces.
 

 


 

 

 

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